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Electrical and Electronic Engineering with Management MEng

 

Fact file - 2015 entry

Qualification:MEng Hons

Type and duration:4 year UG

Qualification name:Electrical and Electronic Engineering with Management

Required subjects: maths and a science or electronics subject plus a third subject (excluding general studies). A foundation year is available for those with BBB grades but not in the required subjects

Years one and two

Years one and two follow an identical structure to BEng Electrical and Electronic Engineering with Management. Progression to the MEng is dependent on obtaining at least 55% in year two.

Year three

MEng students can choose from a range of specialist topics to follow a wide path, or focus on specific technologies. You will also undertake a group project which examines the socio-economic and technical aspects of a major industrial endeavour.

Year four

In year four you will be able to study state-of-the-art technologies taught by world-leading researchers and industrial engineers. A quarter of the final year is management-related and your project will have a substantial component relating to a management, financial or marketing activity. This is where you truly learn to be an engineer!

A levels: AAA-ABB, including maths and a science or electronics subject plus a third subject (excluding general studies). A foundation year is available for those with BBB grades but not in the required subjects

English language requirements

IELTS 6.0 (no less than 5.5 in any element)

Pearson Test of English (Academic) 55 (minimum 51)

Flexible admissions policy

We may make some applicants an offer lower than advertised, depending on their personal and educational circumstances.

Notes for applicants

MEng degrees - the MEng degrees are four-year courses where students study advanced engineering technologies and also develop additional knowledge in aspects of management and commercial practice within industry.

Students graduating with an MEng degree are seen as highly employable in a diverse range of areas, and have a 'fast track' route to achieving chartered engineer status with the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

Modules

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff. They’re also shaped by new developments in industry and as a consequence, may change from year to year. The following list is therefore subject to change but should give you a flavour of the modules on offer. 


Typical Year One Modules

Compulsory

Engineering Mathematics 1

This module introduces the algebra of complex numbers to provide a key mathematical tool for analysis of linear mathematical and engineering problems. The complexity of solving general systems of equations is introduced and their study using matrix techniques. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and workshops.

 

 

Engineering Mathematics 2

You’ll be introduced to techniques for solving selected first-order and second-order differential equations relevant to the analysis of generic engineering problems. The module also provides mathematical tools in terms of advanced differential calculus and vectors for modelling of generic engineering situations given in terms of multi-dimensional models. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and workshops.

 

 

Entrepreneurship and Business

This module provides you with a formal analysis of entrepreneurship in theory and practice leading on to a consideration of creativity and business concept generation. The module concludes with the practical application of these theories and concepts in business planning and business concept presentation. You’ll have a two hour lecture per week.

 

Introduction to Circuits and Fields

This module provides the understanding of the physical world including an introduction to electric and magnetic fields and circuit theory and passive components. For study of this module you’ll spend around three hours in lectures each week.

 

 

Introduction to Electronic Engineering

This module provides an introduction to Electronic Engineering, including topics such as: Boolean algebra and minimisation techniques, linear amplifiers and other circuits utilising the operational amplifier, the physical principles of diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors and their application to circuits. You’ll have three 1-hour lectures per week plus eight 1-hour progress tests per year to study for this module. 

 

 

Introduction to Communications Engineering

You’ll be given an introduction to communication systems and an overview of fundamental signal and system concepts. The module looks at methods to describe signals mathematically and in terms of their time and frequency domain representation. You’ll examine aspects of noise on signals and system performance, filters, amplitude and frequency modulation and basic concepts in digital signal processing. MATLAB will be used in problem solving. You’ll have three 1-hour lectures per week plus four 1-hour progress tests per semester to study for this module. 

 

 

Introduction to Electrical Engineering

This module provides an introduction to Electrical Engineering and covers topics including: basic electromagnetic principles and the characteristics of electrical coils, the operation of ideal and non-ideal transformers, the equivalent circuit and their applications, reactive and apparent power, basic electro-mechanics .You’ll also have a basic introduction to electrical machines focusing on the operation and analysis of the 3-phase AC cage induction machine. You’ll have two 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour examples class per week plus four 1-hour progress tests per semester to study for this module.

 

 

Laboratory and Computer Skills

This module provides the practical experience which complements modules in the first year of your course. It includes experimental and project work, the development of laboratory and team working skills, and technical report writing. You’ll spend three hours in lectures and four hours in practicals per  week studying for this module. 

 

 

New Venture Creation

New Venture Creation will engage you in the more practical elements of innovation and enterprise activity, not just in terms of creating new businesses, but also in terms of entrepreneurship within the corporate environment. This module will prepare you for enterprise activity across a variety of contexts. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and workshops studying for this module. 

 

Typical Year Two Modules

Compulsory

Probabilistic and Numerical Techniques for Engineers

This module is divided into two sections, one part develops the foundations of probability theory and allows you to apply large sample statistics within an engineering context. The other part provides you with an introduction to numerical techniques used for obtaining approximate solutions to ordinary differential equations. You’ll normally spend around one hour per week in lectures and two hours in workshops studying for this module.

 

 

Introduction to Marketing A

This module aims to introduce you to the concept of marketing as an approach to business and discuss the nature of marketing strategy. You’ll investigate the challenges of managing the marketing mix and illustrate how understanding and application of the principles of marketing can assist in the strategic management of the firm. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and seminars studying for this module.

 

 

People and Organisations

Introducing you to the basic ideas of organisational behaviour, you’ll develop an understanding of how individuals behave as members of groups and organisations. You’ll spend around three hours in lectures and have a two-hour computer lab-based simulation tutorial per week for study of this module. 

 

 

Signal Processing and Control Engineering

You’ll develop your understanding of systems and system analysis tools as well as basic analogue and digital signal processing methods that would be of use in a wide range of applications in electrical and electronic engineering and beyond. You’ll have three 2-hour lectures and a three 1-hour practical each week for study of this module. 

 

 

Telecommunications

This module provides an introduction to telecommunication systems. Topics covered include: modulation schemes (amplitude, frequency and phase), receiver configurations, noise and interference in analogue systems, delivery systems (copper, fibre, radio wave propagation and transmission-line characteristics) and multiple access techniques. You’ll spend around three hours in lectures and have a three hour practical per week for study of this module.

 

 

Power Supply Electronics

Introducing you to the subject of power electronics you’ll cover subjects such as: methods of analysis for power electronic circuits, comparison of power supplies for electronic equipment, linear and switching regulators, single phase diode rectifiers comparison of power device types; calculation and management of losses in power devices and practical considerations for high speed switching circuits. You’ll have two 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour problems class per week plus two laboratory sessions.

 

 

Electronic Engineering

You’ll cover a range of topics in Electronic Engineering including: schmitt trigger, feedback and relaxation oscillators, synchronous counters with external input; electron mobility, joule heating, and  structure of bipolar. You’ll spend around six hours per week in lectures as well as having a three hour practical laboratory session to study for this module. 

 

 

Software Engineering Design

Introducing you to the different software design paradigms in use across the range of engineering activity, you’ll examine the concept of object oriented software and its practical implementation in C++, with a full appreciation of the need to design for robustness and the wider needs of code recycling, maintenance and expansion necessary in the modern commercial and technological environment. You’ll spend around two hours in lectures and two hours in practicals per week for study of this module. 

 

 

Electrical Engineering Design Project

This module takes the form of a laboratory-based project which is performed in groups of either three or four students. The overall aim of the project is to design, build, test and document a basic switched reluctance motor drive with microcomputer control. The tasks are specifically designed to be open ended. The project exercises and develops skills in analogue electronic design, digital electronic design, real-time software, presentation and group working. You’ll have one 2-hour lecture during the first week and one 1-hour lecture during the second week plus one three-hour laboratory session per week during study of this module. 

 

 

Mathematical Techniques for Electrical and Electronic Engineers 1

The majority of the module is concerned with providing techniques for solving selected classes of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) relevant to the analysis of engineering topics. This module also provides the basic calculus to help analyse engineering problems in two- or three-dimensions and special solutions of partial differential equations relevant to engineering applications. You’ll have a one hour lecture and two hour workshop to study for this module.  

 

 

Typical Year Three Modules

Compulsory

Human Resource Management I

This module introduces the basic concepts of Human Resource Management (HRM), puts these concepts in broader perspective and subjects them to critical analysis. Areas covered will include: recruitment and selection, appraisal and pay, training, job design, work-life balance, HRM and performance. You’ll spend around two hours in lectures each week to study for this module. 

 

 

Human Resource Management II

This module examines a number of advanced topics in the area of Human Resource Management (HRM). It builds on the previous module Human Resource Management I. The topics covered include: ethical issues in HRM, employment regulation, equality and diversity, and voice and participation. You’ll spend around two hours in lectures each week to study for this module.

 

 

Group Project

Working in groups of between four and six, under the supervision of a member of academic staff, you’ll work on projects encompassing a broad range of engineering skills, involving the design, analysis and evaluation of systems or engineering problems. Assessment of the societal impact of the outcome will form part of the requirement of the project.

 

 


Optional

Mathematics for Engineering Management

This module examines and classifies various (non-statistical) management and operational research problems and their formulation and techniques for solution. Techniques introduced and used concentrate on operations research problems such as linear programming (LP), dynamic programming and nonlinear programming problems. Each week there will normally be a one1- hour lecture and a two hour workshop to introduce key mathematical knowledge on module topics.

 

 

Advanced Mathematical Techniques in Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers

This module covers advanced analytic mathematical techniques used to provide exact or approximate solutions to common classes of ordinary differential equations (ODES) typical in Engineering. Techniques covered include: method of variation of parameters, Laplace transform methods, Taylor series method, Frobenius method, asymptotic regular perturbations and strained coordinates and multiple scales. Each week there will normally be a one 1-hour lecture and a two hour workshop to introduce key mathematical knowledge on module topics.

 

 

Mathematical Techniques in Partial Differential Equations for Engineers

Covering a variety of analytic techniques for solving partial differential equations, topics include: characteristic methods, separation of variables, transform methods (Fourier and Laplace), similarity methods and D’Alembert’s solution and Duhamel’s principle. Each week there will normally be a one 1-hour lecture and a two hour workshop to introduce key mathematical knowledge on module topics.

 

 

Computerised Mathematical Methods in Engineering

The methodology and associated numerical techniques are introduced to enable a selection of mathematical operations to be evaluated with the use of computer-based software algorithms to problems that cannot be solved analytically. Topics include: introduction to concepts of numerical analysis, quadrature and curve fitting, numerical linear algebra, qualitative and finite-difference methods for ODEs and numerical methods for solving PDEs. Each week there will normally be a one 1-hour lecture and a two hour workshop to introduce key mathematical knowledge on module topics.

 

 

Electronic Design

Engineers working in industry usually find that they become involved in extended practical or theoretical projects. This module provides an opportunity for you to work in a similar situation. You’ll indicate your project preferences then work under the supervision of an expert member of staff to write a dissertation on your work and present it publicly. You’ll have weekly individual tutorial with your project supervisor, but otherwise you’ll be expected to work alone. 

 

 

Solid State Devices

This module seeks to develop a detailed understanding of the internal operating mechanisms of semiconductor electronic and opto-electronic devices. You’ll focus on devices based on pn junctions (e.g. diodes, bipolar junction transistors) and devices based on MOS capacitors (eg memory cells, CCD detectors, MOSFETs). The module will consider how the targeted application for a device impacts upon its design. (For example, signal-mixing diodes, power diodes, light-emitting diodes and solar cells are all based upon the pn diode, but provide very different functionality.) The characteristics required of these devices will be discussed in relation to their incorporation into appropriate electronic systems. You’ll have two 1-hour lectures each week for study of this module, supplemented with example sheets. 

 

 

VLSI Design

Introducing you to the principles of semi-custom and full custom design of integrated circuits (IC) for digital electronic systems, the module is based around the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit process that is used to fabricate the majority of ICs in production today. The module provides insight into the issues involved in IC design through the analysis of examples based around logic gates. Layout design techniques for CMOS logic gates are covered. You’ll have one 2-hour lecture and one 2-hour CAD laboratory per week for study of this module.

 

 

Telecommunication Electronics

This module covers the design and analysis of electronic systems used in telecommunications particularly wireless devices. Systems covered include: amplifiers, oscillators, phase-locked loops and mixers. You’ll have 2 one-hour lectures and a two 1-hour practical each week to study for this module.

 

 

Power Networks

This module provides you with an understanding of power system apparatus and their behaviour under normal and fault conditions. Through a two hour lecture each week, you’ll cover topics such as: concept and analysis of load flow, voltage/current symmetrical components, computation of fault currents, economic optimisation, power-system control and stability, power system protection and power quality.

 

 

Electrical Machines

This module provides you with an understanding of the operational characteristics of common electrical machines (dc, ac induction, ac synchronous and stepping). Both theoretical and practical characteristics are covered including: electromagnetic theory applied to electrical machines, principles and structure of dc machines - commutation effects, principles and structure of induction machines, principles and structure of synchronous machines, parameterisation for performance prediction and machine testing and evaluation. You’ll have two 1-hour lectures per week, supplemented with practical demonstrations for study of this module.

 

 

Energy Conversion for Motor and Generator Drives

Introducing you to the concepts and operating principles of variable speed electric motor drives systems, you’ll use a number of system examples to demonstrate how the drive systems are specified, designed, controlled and operated. You’ll have a two hour lecture each week for study of this module. 

 

 

Power Electronic Design

Providing an understanding of the operational principles of power electronic converters and their associated systems, this module covers: 3-phase naturally commutated ac-dc/dc-ac converters, capacitive and inductive smoothing - device ratings, dc-ac PWM inverters and modulation strategies, resonant converters, high power factor utility interface circuits and power converter topologies for high power (multilevel). You’ll have two 1-hour lectures per week.

 

 

Financial Accounting

This module will introduce the nature and purpose of financial accounting. Some of the modules studied include: Key accounting concepts, the impact of accounting policy selection, accounting standards and the recording and collating of accounting.  In addition, accounting reports eg Income Statements, Balance Sheets and Cash Flow statements will be developed from accounting data. An understanding of some contemporary accounting issues will also be developed through spending an hour in lectures and an hour in seminars each week for study of this module. 

 

 

Management Accounting and Decisions I

In this module you will cover the following topics: cost concepts and allocation of manufacturing overheads, absorption and variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costing and budgeting. Material for this module will be delivered in a variety of ways including lectures, seminars, tutorials and talks from  guest speakers. 

 

 

Production and Inventory Management

This module describes the main factors which influence the needs of a manufacturing control (production and inventory control) system including the market, the manufacturing and information processing technology and the skills of the workforce. All major concepts and philosophies in production and inventory management are covered through a two hour lecture per week. 

 

 

Introduction to Business Operations

This module aims to give you an initial appreciation of the main elements and techniques of operations management, within a business context. You’ll spend around two hours in lectures and one hour in seminars each week for study of this module.

 

 

 


Typical Year Four Modules

Compulsory

Industrial/Research Orientated Project

You’ll work on an individual project of direct industrial or research relevance which will usually be undertaken in collaboration with a suitable company. The normal expectation is that the project specification will be drawn up following consultation between you, your project supervisor and an advisor at the collaborating company. You’ll work under the supervision of a member of staff with weekly individual tutorials and where appropriate will maintain contact with the collaborating company through meetings and visits.

 

 


Optional 

In your fourth year there are over 30 modules you may choose from in the following areas:

  • Business, Management and Finance
  • Advanced Technologies
  • Advanced Power Systems
  • Control Systems
  • Mobile and Computational Designs

The following list is a selection of the possible options you have; for more information please contact the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Strategic Management I

This module examines the different approaches to - and techniques of - strategic management including analysis of the external and internal environments, the nature of competitive advantage and the development of the firm. You’ll have a two hour lecture and one hour of tutorials per week to study for this module. 

 

 

Strategic Management II

This module examines the managerial and organisational factors that influence the formation and subsequent realisation of strategy. The course enables you to develop skills in the analysis of strategic processes, with particular reference to the role of leadership, change, learning, and power strategy. You’ll have a two hour lecture and one hour of tutorials each week to study for this module.

 

 

Logistics and Supply Chain Management

This module provides an introduction to logistics and supply chain management (LSCM) within the international context. As such, the module examines how LSCM strategies contribute to businesses' competitive advantage. It also considers the relationship aspects between business partners in delighting end-customers, and supporting operational activities and the international transport of goods. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and seminars studying for this module. 

 

 

Modelling and Simulation

Simulation is an important tool for aiding the design and management of operations in manufacturing and service industries. The module introduces the principles, roles and practice of modelling in general, and of simulation in particular through a two hour lecture each week. The mechanics of simulation, the conduct of a simulation study and the software available will all be covered. Furthermore a two hour, weekly hands-on exercise demonstrates the use of a particular software package and its application in a practical context.

 

 

Plant Location and Design

All companies have to choose where to locate their premises and how to arrange the manufacturing and service departments within those premises. This module provides an understanding of the factors which influence a company's choice of location, and of how to approach the design of layouts to support a company's strategic objectives and maximise the efficiency of its operations. You’ll have a one 1- hour lecture and a two hour seminar each week to study for this module. 

 

 

RF Microelectronics with project

In this module, you’ll discuss the design of high speed Analogue and Digital circuits before the limitations of BJTs and MOSFETs are given. You’ll also examine High speed HEMT and HBTs through spending two hours in lectures each week and project work.

 

 

Photonic Communications Components

This module introduces the principles and application of a wide range of photonic devices, currently used in photonics telecoms. Some of the specific topics covered include: carrier transport and recombination processes in semiconductors; light-emitting diodes (LEDs); laser diodes (both for signal sources and amplifier pumps); LED and laser diode modulation (rate equation descriptions, equivalent circuits, modulation and small-signal performance analysis); APD and PIN diode detectors; detector response (sensitivity, bandwidth and noise);. You’ll have a two hour lecture each week to study for this module. 

 

 

Power Electronics Integration

Introducing you to dynamic modelling techniques for switching power converters, you’ll cover the requirements of and design of control loops for switching power converters as well as properties and operation of load resonant power converters. You’ll have five  4-hour lectures to study for this module.

 

 

Advanced Control System Design

This module introduces the state-space representation of physical systems and the control design of multi-input multi-output systems using multivariable control techniques for both continuous and discrete implementation. The module then covers both the full and reduced observer design for those cases when state variables are not measurable. You’ll have three hours of lectures per week, supplementary printed notes and example classes. 

 

 

Optical Communications and Networks

Introducing you to the concepts and operating principles of optical communication systems, the devices (and fibre) which underpin them and the networks they can be used to form. You’ll have a weekly two hour lecture and a one 1-hour examples class for study of this module. 

 

 

Applied Computational Engineering

This module covers the development of advanced engineering software projects, spanning a range of application areas. Generic topics to be discussed include: Large-scale software management, robust design and coding techniques, accurate and efficient numerical computing for technological simulations, parallel computing techniques applicable to several classes of parallel computer e. multicore, distributed and graphics processing unit (GPU) based systems, database design and implementation. You’ll have a two hour lecture each week to study for this module.

 

Careers

With the broad range of skills you will acquire from this degree, you will have excellent career prospects in areas as diverse as software development, fibre optic and mobile communications, aerospace technology, automotive systems and renewable energy technologies. 

Many of our students like a fast-track route into management and related disciplines such as marketing, sales and finance and this degree was created specifically for them!

Graduates with a MEng degree will have studied technical subjects to a more advanced level than BEng. 

 

 

 

 

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