Menu

Industrial/Organisational and Business Psychology MSc

 

Industrial/Organisational and Business Psychology deals with human capital issues and is instrumental in helping businesses become more effective and profitable, as well as improving employees' well-being and performance. This brand new MSc will prepare students for academic research and professional practice in this field.

 

International equivalencies

Equivalent qualifications for Pakistan

 

The award of any of the following from a recognised institution:

 

Bachelor of Engineering (BEngg), Bachelor of Science (Engineering) (BScEngg) degree of 4 years in duration or Bachelor of Law, in the First Division and an overall average mark of 75% from a recognised public institution

Master's degree (following a 4 year Bachelor's degree) of 2 years in duration in humanities and commerce subjects in the First Division and an overall average mark of 75% from a recognised public institution

Master's degree (following a 2 or 3 year Bachelor's degree) in Agriculture, Architecture, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine or Medicine in the First Division from a recognised public institution

Applicants holding any other degree-level qualifications from recognised degree-awarding institutions should contact Admissions for further advice

 

ALTERNATIVE QUALIFICATIONS

 

Medical / Dental / Pharmacy degree from a recognised public insituition; Master of Engineering (MEng) or Master of Science in Engineering (MScEng) degree from a recognised public institution; Master's degree (following a 4 year Bachelor's degree) of 2 years in duration in a science, agriculture, architecture, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine or medicine subject from a recognised public institution; MPhil/PhD degree from a recognised public institution. Applicants holding any other degree-level qualifications from recognised degree-awarding institutions should contact Admissions for further advice.

 

International equivalencies

 

Equivalent qualifications for Pakistan

The award of any of the following from a recognised institution:

·       Bachelor of Engineering (BEngg), Bachelor of Science (Engineering) (BScEngg) degree of 4 years in duration or Bachelor of Law, in the First Division and an overall average mark of 75% from a recognised public institution

·       Master's degree (following a 4 year Bachelor's degree) of 2 years in duration in humanities and commerce subjects in the First Division and an overall average mark of 75% from a recognised public institution

·       Master's degree (following a 2 or 3 year Bachelor's degree) in Agriculture, Architecture, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine or Medicine in the First Division from a recognised public institution

·       Applicants holding any other degree-level qualifications from recognised degree-awarding institutions should contact Admissions for further advice

 

ALTERNATIVE QUALIFICATIONS

Medical / Dental / Pharmacy degree from a recognised public insituition; Master of Engineering (MEng) or Master of Science in Engineering (MScEng) degree from a recognised public institution; Master's degree (following a 4 year Bachelor's degree) of 2 years in duration in a science, agriculture, architecture, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine or medicine subject from a recognised public institution; MPhil/PhD degree from a recognised public institution. Applicants holding any other degree-level qualifications from recognised degree-awarding institutions should contact Admissions for further advice.

 

Content

 

Objectives and Outcomes

The programme provides an understanding of all the fundamental psychological issues concerning the behaviour of individuals at work, including their job performance, motivation, and occupational health. The MSc includes six core modules, including the Psychology of Behaviour at Work and Talent Management, as well as a wide range of optional modules from various other NU departments and programmes.

This MSc will equip all students with a wide range of skills, methods and theories
concerning key applications of psychology to organisations and businesses today. Areas of application will include: finance (psychology of money and banking); marketing and advertising (social psychology of attitudes and consumer preferences); personnel selection, training and development, and workplace motivation (organisational psychology).

The MSc will emphasise applied, consulting and practical skills to enhance students’ employability by helping them develop key psychological business skills and knowledge.

 

 

Why Study at NU

In line with the tradition of NU’s Psychology and Language Sciences Division, students will receive the most advanced methodological training and conduct state of-the-art research in areas relevant to business/organisational psychology – especially during their final year dissertation. NU’s Division of Psychology and Language Sciences is one of the top Psychology departments in the world NU usually rates as in the top 5 universities in Great Britain and in the top 20 in the world In addition, students will benefit from the commercial experience of senior faculty members, and links with other NU departments (where they will be able to take optional/elective modules). The course will be international in its perspective and courses taught by Professors with extensive international business experience. The transfer of knowledge provided by this programme will apply worldwide, particularly the US, Europe and Asia.    

The prestige of NU, its Psychology and Language Sciences Division, and unique academic expertise in the offered areas - including Professor Furnham, a world renowned authority in Industrial/Organisational and Business Psychology (with both academic and corporate experience), and Professor Chamorro-Premuzic (the course director and international authority in talent management, consumer and media psychology) make this a unique programme.

This is the first MSc of its kind in the UK (as it will cover both Industrial- Organisational and Business Psychology). The programme will offer good networking opportunities with global organisations and the possibility to work closely with businesses during the MSc research dissertation. NU staff have a track record consulting to leading organisations in both public and private sector: clients and partners have included Goldman Sachs, HSBC, the BBC, Unilever, and the British Army.

Who is the programme for?

This MSc is ideal for those who want to specialise in Work Psychology, as well as those with an interest in commercial and organisational applications of psychological theories and methods. It will also equip those interested in management consultancy as well as starting their own psychological consultancy. Psychology graduates, as well as graduates from related disciplines (especially Social Sciences: e.g., management, economics, sociology, and business) will normally be eligible to apply. Each case is judged on its merits.

Business Psychology is a growing area of applied psychology and includes well established organisational processes, such as staffing and human resources, training and development, employee engagement surveys, and performance management. In broad terms, this sub-branch of Psychology deals with human capital issues and is instrumental in helping businesses become more effective and profitable, as well as improving employees‘ well-being and performance. Although Occupational/Work Psychology has a well-defined tradition in the UK, most Masters programmes are restricted by DETC accreditation requirements and offer only a limited range of content-based modules (typically, they include human factors and ergonomics, organisational health and behaviour, personnel selection and training and development). This MSc will still cover all these areas, but it will also provide students with a range of optional modules including other business applications of psychology.

 

Structure

The course will be made up of 8 taught modules and a research project. There will be 6 core modules, which will provide students with a firm basis in both the theory and practice of Industrial/Organisational Psychology and Business Psychology. The additional modules will be selected by students from a list of options (including not only modules from Psychology but also other departments). The options and research project will, therefore, allow students to pursue their own specific interests, and complete a significant piece of research work.

Teaching and Assessment

For full time students, most teaching will be covered in terms 1 and 2 (approximately three days a week). The third term will focus primarily on the research/MSc dissertation. Assessment will comprise final exam papers (in the summer), coursework (essays and presentations), and the final research/MSc dissertation.

 

 

MSc Dissertation

All students will undertake an independent research project with the supervision of
a staff member.


PSYCGB01: Consulting Psychology

Most I/O, business and work psychologists end up doing consultancy work. Whether employed by the public or the private sector, they tend to get called in to do various types of consultancy work which may involve anything from training and coaching to major intervention work around devising, carrying out or evaluating various processes, procedures or systems.

This course looks at a number of management issues that psychologists often get called in to investigate. They represent the sort of assignments that most modern consultancies are involved in today. The “lectures” are described as workshops because they will involve not only a traditional lecture but also some discussion and activities which are typically used in these assignments. To some extent the workshops model how consultants would “train” clients. In this sense the course is as much practical as academic and requires reasonable amounts of student participation and interaction.

Learning Outcomes

Through this module, students are expected to develop knowledge and understanding of:

- How the individual behaves in organizations

- How organizations affect individuals’ behaviour

- How and why individuals differ in motivation, ability and productivity at work

- How recent technological advances are shaping the world of employment

- Why certain organizations are more effective than others

- How psychologists can contribute to different types of organisational roles

Assessment

This module is assessed by one essay and one unseen exam.

The recommended reading for this course is:

Furnham, A. (2005). The psychology of behaviour at work: the individual in the organisation. Psychology Press (2nd edition).

There is also a short reading list attached to each lecture. Both “popular” and academic books and papers will be included in the supplementary reading list.

PSYGB0762: Talent Management

This module reviews the current state of knowledge regarding themes, core processes, methods, and theories of personnel selection, training and development, and career success. In particular, lectures will discuss the psychological determinants of job performance and career potential, interventions designed to motivate and retain employees, and the socio-economic implications of selecting, developing and retaining talent. Core constructs to be examined include abilities and personality traits, and the most widely used methods for selection (interviews, references, letters of recommendation and psychometric testing). Lectures will also discuss executive coaching techniques and training strategies in the current world of organizations. Thus this course examines the practical implications of talent management, as well as how psychological theories and methods can help us predict, understand, and influence talent in organizations.

Learning Outcomes

Through the course, students are expected to develop knowledge and understanding of:

- The psychology of career success and employability

- Theories and methods of personnel selection and staffing

- The validity of psychometric testing methods

- Training and development techniques (theory and practice)

- Future directions for psychological applications in the area of talent

- Cultural and socio-economic impact of talent-based selection

The recommended reading for this course is:

Chamorro-Premuzic, T., & Furnham, A. (2010). The psychology of personnel selection. New York: Cambridge University Press.

There is also a short reading list attached to each lecture (primarily electronic journal articles, which will be accessible through the NU library)

Assessment

There are two assignments (each worth 50% of the final grade): a group oral presentation in the final session and an individual essay (topic and deadline tbc)

PBYCGB03: Business Psychology Seminars

This module will consist of 20 hours sessions facilitated by visiting speakers. Speakers will include business psychologists who work as consultants or who are eminent researches in the field, as well as leading figures from the world of HR, psychological test publishers, etc. The module is designed to give students direct exposure to opinion formers in applied psychology, and speakers will represent different key areas of application of industrial/organisational and business psychology.

Aims

To introduce students to professional practitioners in the key areas of industrial/organisational and Business psychology; to provide an opportunity to apply the theories and methods covered in other modules; to provide students with networking opportunities.

Learning Outcomes

Through the course, students are expected to develop knowledge and understanding of:

· What business psychologists do in the real world

· Different career paths for professional Industrial/Organisational Psychology

· Understand applications of personality to HR and human capital

· Understand different roles for psychologists in organisations.

Assessment

The only assessment for this module is a critical essay about one of the seminar sessions below (precise instructions to follow).

Speakers for these lectures will be confirmed in Term 2.

 

PSWRB04: Consumer Behaviour

This module reviews the current state of knowledge regarding themes, core processes, methods, and theories of consumer behaviour and psychology. In particular, lectures will discuss the psychological determinants of consumer implicit decision-making as well as, we will be exploring the role of affect and persuasion in a number of academic and applied fields of consumer behaviour. Core constructs to be examined include the impact and role of affect and decision process in light of some resent theoretical developments with practical implications. Lectures will also discuss consumer behaviour techniques and strategies may influence the success of a number of behavioural change initiatives within a number of industries (i.e., health promotion, fiscal management, media, and politics). Thus this course examines the practical implications of consumer behaviour, as well as how psychological theories and methods can help us predict, understand, and behavioural change.

Learning Outcomes

Through the course, students are expected to develop knowledge and understanding of:

● Implicit Consumer Cognition

● Theories and methods of behavioural proving

● Attitude Change and Persuasion

● Goal directed consumer behaviour: motivation and affect

● Social Values in Consumer Psychology

● Experimental Designs in Behavioural Change applications

● Self-regulation

Assessment

Oral presentation – 20 minutes

Essay – 3000 words


PSYCGR01: Statistics

This course provides a thorough introduction to the General Linear Model, which incorporates analyses such as multiple regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA, repeated-measures ANOVA. We will also cover extensions to linear mixed-effects models and logistic regression. All techniques will be discussed within a general framework of building and comparing statistical models. Practical experience in applying the methods will be developed through exercises with the statistics package SPSS. Aims

This module is intended to give a more advanced and flexible understanding of the statistical methods to analyse experimental data. The aim is to give students with the skills and confidence to analyse their data, even in complex and non-standard cases.

Objectives

Through the course, students are expected to develop the ability to: - structure and summarise quantitative data - define and test hypotheses in terms of the General Linear Model and extensions into mixed-effects models and logistic regression - use and assess the value of computer-software for statistical analysis

Key skills provided by module

Flexible statistical thinking - using and interpreting statistical hypothesis tests - use of statistical software (SPSS)


MSUYG024: Influence and Negotiation

Through a series of group simulations, exercises, feedback, and debrief sessions, this course will provide students with the fundamentals of effective negotiation and communication. Students will become equipped with a toolkit to address a range of contexts that call for negotiation skills. The experiential learning approach will guide towards a better awareness and understanding of negotiation strategies and tactics to apply to real-world negotiations.

Whether students encounter cooperative or distrustful counterparts, or are confronted with multiple stakeholders, the core concepts presented in the course will help them develop wiser decision-making strategies under pressure, a more systematic framework to prepare for and execute negotiations, and greater facility in approaches for creating and capturing value in negotiation.

Objectives

The ability to negotiate and communicate well is critical to your performance as a manager or executive. This course is designed to allow students to become more effective negotiators and managers through growth in several areas:

- Leveraging strengths in communication with multiple parties

- Designing sustainable agreements that maximize value

- Achieving superior results under highly competitive conditions

- Resolving disputes and achieving desired outcomes

- Anticipating the perspective and strategy of counterparts

- Working with a wide diversity of expectations and values

Course Grading

Class Participation 50%

Final Exam 50%


PSYQGB0659: Dissertation

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words max.

Optional Modules

 Plus two optional modules from this list:

Applied Decision Making (Psychology)

Judgement and Decision Making (Psychology)

Social Cognition: Affect and Motivation (Psychology)

Current Issues in Attitude Research (Psychology)

Psychology of Health (Psychology)

Understanding Individuals and Groups (Psychology)

Social Psychology

Principles of Cognition (Psychology)

Project Management (Management Science and Innovation)

Mastering Entrepreneurship (Management Science and Innovation)

Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice (Management Science and Innovation)

Applied Cognitive Science (Human-Computer Interaction)

 

Timetable

The timetable will be confirmed but students will attend lectures and tutorials for 2-3 days a week during the first and second terms, and focus on their research dissertation during the third term.

 

 

 

 

 

Career

Students are typically expected to enrol in this programme to maximise their employment prospects, enhance their employability, and develop as professional psychologists within large government or commercial organisations (as HR executives, recruitment consultants, executive coaches, leadership and management consultants, etc).

In the past couple of year some students have gone on to work/intern at the following companies:

Visual DNA

Participle

Google

PHD Media

Havas

Metropolitan Police

Essentia Analytics

Royal Bank of Scotland

YSC

Unilever

Metaprofiling

Hogan Assessments

 

Recommended Reading Lists


Chamorro-Premuzic, T., & Furnham, T. (2010). The psychology of personnel selection.
New York: Cambridge University Press.

Furnham, A. (2005). The psychology of behaviour at work: the individual in the
organisation (2nd edition). Hove: Psychology Press.

Furnham, A. (2009) Personality and Intelligence at work. London: Routledge

Charles M. Judd, Gary H. McClelland, and Carey S. Ryan,  "Data Analysis: A Model Comparison Approach" (2 edition), Routledge, 2008. (seehttp://www.dataanalysisbook.com/)

 

 

Go to top