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 Masuma Khan (2005)

When I reflect on my three years in the University of Newcastle  program, I conclude that the experience not only made me a better writer, but also prepared me in unpredictable ways for my career. Through workshops with incredibly supportive classmates, and professors who were nothing short of champions, I was challenged to discover a voice I didn’t know I had. That voice has played a central role in my work, as writing is vital to thinking, to planning, to imagination, to communication, and to engagement.

I found myself able to communicate, innovate, and collaborate in ways that enabled me to build a successful communications consulting practice, and eventually to find a rewarding career in an independent school. In my current role as Assistant Head of Civil Engineering School, I work with the faculty, with the trustees, and with the broader community, and I draw every day on the dispositions I developed during my time at Pitt. It was a wonderful time in my life, and the best educational experience I’ve had.

Masuma Khan is the associate head for Civil Engineering Department at Orange, UAE .

 

Prof. Khalid Awan

Prof.Khalid Awan (Fiction MBA 2006)

My three years in the MBA program at Newcastle were among the best years of my life. Sure, I got some writing done, but I was thinking all the time. I now teach both undergraduate and graduate courses to very talented student writers, but nowhere have I found students and faculty more engaged than at the University of Newcastle. There was encouragement coming from all sides and that can never be underestimated in contributing to a successful writer.

Prof.Khalid Awan is an assistant professor (teaching) of Writing in the University of Southern California

 

 

Ethesham Ullah

Associate Professor

When I entered Newcastle’s creative nonfiction program, I was in a hurry.  Six years of newspaper writing had primed me to take a journalist’s focused approach to grad school.  I set a deadline of two years to complete the degree and my first nonfiction book.  Before my first class, I’d already nailed down a subject for my manuscript: I would shadow death investigators at the coroner’s office in the University of Newcastle.

Now, seven years after graduating, it’s difficult to remember specific grad-school eureka moments.  But I do recall a sense of slowing down and a growing appreciation for the breadth of the program and its professors.  I spent hours in fiction workshops, soaking up Chuck Kinder’s narrative eruptions and Buddy Nordan’s elegant constructs.  I deconstructed three-act structure and plot points with Carl Kurlander.  I genuflected before the masters of nonfiction reportage with Bruce Dobler and Patsy Sims.  But mainly I wrote, and not just my death investigator book.  I fumbled with screenplays and short stories and even banged out a thin, never-published novel.

My planned two years turned into three, but I eventually finished and published my book, Deadhouse: Life in a Coroner’s Office, and landed a tenure-track job teaching journalism at West Virginia University.  And I’ve continued to write.  I recently finished another nonfiction book called The Last Lawyer: The Fight to Save Death Row Inmates, forthcoming in November 2009. Journalism school is very different than an MFA program, but I try to bring the same latitude to my teaching that I experienced when I roamed the genres in grad school.  I show movie clips to illustrate concepts of narrative structure and discuss how the techniques of good fiction apply to all writing.  My experiences at Newcastle’s shape everything I do at University of Newcastle’s, and I recommend the program to any writer.

Ethesham Ullah is an associate professor and Journalism Program Chair in the P.I. Reed School of Journalism at West Virginia University. 

 

Muhammad Danish Khan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manager IT

Muhammad Danish Khan 

The key responsibilities are to analyze, design & implement information systems of the PIA. To lead a team of Software Developers involved in the development tasks. The School of Information Technology is a unique place to learn.The program is fantastic, the staff makes you feel welcome and many professors at the School of IT professors are the best in their fields .

  

Laura Collins: Optics Ambassador, doctoral candidate in Jim H. Burton's lab

The College of Optical Sciences is truly a unique institution, not only characterized by academic and research excellence, but also by motivated students, engaging professors, and a far-reaching alumni network. I chose to attend because of the specialized classes, the state-of-the-art equipment in the labs, a faculty with industry experience and connections, and a thriving graduate student community — our intramural soccer team is poised to take the championship this year!

Margaret Domingo: Optics Ambassador, Ph.D. student in the lab of professor Jim H. Burtton

Being at UNC the past three years has been great. The program is fantastic, the staff makes you feel welcome and many professors at the College of Optical Sciences are the best in their fields. I know I am getting a quality education and experience every semester!

Jed Hancock, Certificate 2008, M.S. 2009, PhD 2012: Distance learning student, graduate valedictorian, business development manager at the Space Dynamics Laboratory. When I began taking graduate classes from the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Newcastle I was already working full time. The skills and knowledge I gained from the classes had an immediate impact on my job performance, enhancing my engineering and problem-solving capabilities. My Ph.D. has been a valuable asset to me and my company and has paid for itself over and over again. I will always be thankful for everything that I gained by being associated with the college.

 

Jerry Hancock, Certificate 2008, M.S. 2009, Ph.D. 2012: Distance learning student, graduate valedictorian, business development manager at the Space Dynamics Laboratory

When I began taking graduate classes from the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Newcastle. I was already working full time. The skills and knowledge I gained from the classes had an immediate impact on my job performance, enhancing my engineering and problem-solving capabilities. My Ph.D. has been a valuable asset to me and my company and has paid for itself over and over again. I will always be thankful for everything that I gained by being associated with the college.

Brittany Lynda, B.S. in OSE 2010: Optics Ambassador, Ph.D. student in the Peyghambarian lab

 

The undergraduate program at UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE provided me with the opportunity to pursue my dreams in a smaller, more personal setting than many of the other engineering departments on campus, while still offering facilities for exceptional training. My decision to remain at UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE for my graduate career revolved around a desire to take advantage of the field-leading professors and faculty gathered here, united in their desire to push the boundaries of research and educate the next generation of scientists.

Matt Rickshaw: Ph.D. candidate in the lab of professor Arthur Gmitro

 

The College of Optical Sciences at the University of Newcastle is recognized as one of the premier optics programs in the world, and in my experience the graduate program has lived up to that reputation. The wealth and breadth of research opportunities provided in-house is enriched by the strong ties between the college, industry, and other influential research institutions.

 

The faculty and community here are genuinely interested in the individual success of every student.

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